Yarnitecture book review

Yarnitecture book reviewYarnitecture: A Knitter's Guide to Spinning: Building Exactly the Yarn You Want by Jillian Moreno
Published by Storey Publishing on September 6th 2016
Genres: craft
Pages: 240
Format: ebook
Source: netgalley
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four-stars

Create your dream yarn! Discover the pleasures of designing and building custom-made yarn by spinning it yourself, choosing everything from color to feel and gauge.

Jillian Moreno leads you through every step of yarn construction, with detailed instructions and step-by-step photos showing you how to select the fiber you want (wool, cotton, silk, synthetic), establish a foundation, and spin a beautiful yarn with the structure, texture, and color pattern that you want.

In addition to teaching you the techniques you need for success, Moreno also offers 12 delicious original patterns from prominent designers, each one showcasing hand-spun yarns. 

This beautiful book begins with a gorgeous cover, and is filled with photos of handspun yarn and various items knitted from handspun yarn.

The book begins with the usual introductions, and of course talks about the various types of wools. Naturally you’d expect that in any handspinning book. The book also talks about spinning with intention, which I think made some interesting points. The book also covers preparing fiber for spinning, and talks about the importance of twist, types of plying, finding balance, etc; again, with photos that can’t help but inspire you (and makes me wish I was a much better spinner, with an actual spinning wheel and not just a hand spindle!)

Then there’s a lot of information about color, color theory, etc., followed by finishing your yarn.

Lastly, there’s a small, but nice, section of patterns specific to handspun yarn, by well known designers.

All in all, I think this is a must for any hand-spinners library, especially those that may not be spinning for a long time.

 

I read this book as part of May’s Clean Sweep challenge.

four-stars

Gear Girl

I received this book for free from in exchange for my honest opinions/ review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

This post contains affiliate links you can use to purchase the book. If you buy the book using that link, I will receive a small commission from the sale.

Gear GirlGear Girl by J.M. Davis
Published by Amazon Digital Services on 2016
Pages: 414
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Awaking in a strange place, Eleanor is afraid, and panicked. Unfamiliar people claiming to be her family nurse her back to health, but their vague answers seem to only stir up more questions. Where is she? How did she get the scar in the center of her chest? And what happened to her memories?

Over time, Eleanor learns she has been fitted with a mechanical heart, and the body she inhabits once belonged to someone else.

With the truth finally revealed, depression nearly drives her to her deathbed. After being rushed to the hospital, Eleanor must learn to accept her second-chance at life. Believing she is less than human with her steel heart, Eleanor needs a reminder that she is more than just clockwork, and gears. Percy Oliver, does just that.

But, is her heart capable of love? Or is it just a machine crafted of cold metal?

Geargirlteaser.jpg

Gear Girl is a great new book that just came out in June, that I am dying to read. If I wasn’t drowning in a sea of “to be read” books already, I’d already have this book in my grubby little hands!

 

Excerpt

“Your body died the day of the accident,” says the man. “But I was able to restore life into it.” He pauses to rifle through the loose paper in his medical journal. “I fitted you with a mechanical heart.” He holds a sheet of paper up between his fingers. Messy notes fill the corners and in the center is a drawing of a human heart. But instead of being made of flesh and blood, this one is solid steel and equipped with cogs, metal gears and the intricate workings of a clock.
I gasp, and clutch my chest. Those were the drawings I saw? My heart clunks and ticks beneath my fingers, and his words slap me like an opened hand. No! No, this cannot be true!
“I don’t believe you,” I say. “A mechanical heart isn’t possible.”
“The stitching,” he explains, gesturing to me. “You were not impaled. I opened your chest to replace your heart with the mechanical one. I built it Eleanor. The heart pumping life into your body was constructed by my two hands.”

On a Pale Horse by Piers Anthony

I received this book for free from library in exchange for my honest opinions/ review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

This post contains affiliate links you can use to purchase the book. If you buy the book using that link, I will receive a small commission from the sale.

On a Pale Horse by Piers AnthonyOn a Pale Horse by Piers Anthony
Series: Incarnations of Immortality #1
Published by Del Rey on September 12th 1986
Genres: fantasy
Pages: 325
Format: paperback
Source: library
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When Zane shoots Death, he has to take the job, speeding over the world riding Mortis, his pale horse/limo, measuring souls for the exact balance of Good and Evil, sending each to Heaven or Hell instead of Purgatory. The new Thanatos is superbly competent, ends pain when he ends lives. But Satan is forging a trap for Luna, the woman Death loves.

I’m re-reading the Incarnations of Immortality series as part of my Read all the Books challenge: the reviews will be even shorter and pithier than my usual short pithy reviews 🙂 and will serve more as a reminder and a placeholder for which books I’ve re-read and when.

Besides the fact that Piers Anthony is still -oh-so-sexist- (though not as bad as in the Xanth series), and the fact that he can’t write female characters to save his life, I still do enjoy this book. Others have said that this one is the best of the series, and I think I agree, though I also really enjoyed #6 (though most say the last two books suck). I definitely enjoyed the re-read and I am definitely looking forward to reading the next one, but I’m going to try to take a break from Anthony for a month or so because one really does need a break from his writing, even when you do enjoy his books (overall) like I do.

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

Harry Potter: series review

Harry Potter: series reviewGenres: YA
five-stars

Orphan Harry learns he is a wizard on 11th birthday when Hagrid escorts him to magic-teaching Hogwarts School. As a baby, his mother's love protected him and vanquished villain Voldemort, leaving child famous as "The Boy who Lived". With friends Hermione and Ron, he has to win over the returned "One Who Must Not Be Named". Not all his friends survive massive war.

So Harry Potter is still one of my all time favorite series, ever.

I love the fact that the characters are not perfect. So many books are ruined by Mary Sue’s, and the fact that Harry has a hero complex, and Lupin is scared of having a baby and making a commitment to Tonks, and Dumbledore is just so vain and proud, and Hermoine is a know-it-all, and Ron can be just so STUPID, and Fred and George at times were just so immature… but it’s such a large part of what makes this world so real to us, and why we love the books just so so much.

So many kids learned to love to read because of this series, so that gives it an A++ in my book (if I had said book *grin*). This series was one of the first books I could convince my “I hate to read” husband to read, and though he didn’t love them as much as I did, just the fact that he read them and finished them – eventually – was a huge accomplishment. Because of this series, Jon started thinking – just a little bit – that books aren’t as scary as he always thought (and years later, he actually reads with me once or twice a week! Guys, this is huge!)

One of the other things I love about the book is how J.K. Rowling writes the bad guys in the book, and writes about evil in the book. You’d think all the death and all the despair and darkness in the later books would give kids nightmares, but have you ever heard of a kid having a nightmare from reading the books? They don’t. The books are somehow managed to be written in such a way that children know what’s happening, and the adults know what is happening, but no one is going to wake up screaming. that’s amazing.

five-stars

the Source of Magic

I received this book for free from Own book in exchange for my honest opinions/ review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

This post contains affiliate links you can use to purchase the book. If you buy the book using that link, I will receive a small commission from the sale.

the Source of MagicThe Source of Magic (Xanth, #2) by Piers Anthony
Published by Del Rey on 1979
Genres: fantasy
Pages: 255
Format: paperback
Source: Own book
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Ordered by King Trent to determine the source of Xanth's magic, Bink and his companions were harried by an unseen enemy determined to thwart them. When even their protector turned against them, Bink still managed to reach his goal and carry out the King's orders...but the king did not expect Bink's next act--to destroy utterly the magic of Xanth!

I originally reviewed the Source of Magic on the blog in 2009 here, and wrote a series review about Xanth as well.

I’m re-reading most of the Xanth series as part of my Read all the Books challenge: the reviews will be even shorter and pithier than my usual short pithy reviews 🙂 and will serve more as a reminder and a placeholder for which books I’ve re-read and when.


I know I liked this book a lot before, but re-reading it again as an adult it falls way short. It’s just too much sexism/constant dirty jokes/lame puns that aren’t even trying to be funny/did I mention the constant sexual jokes?

The plot is really thin on this one, too, and the climax of the novel – a debate about setting a demon free – falls really short. I feel like I’m missing the point of the scene or perhaps the entire novel, but I don’t think it’s me, I think it’s how the scene is written.

It’s just lacking the something something that makes most of these books so magical and fun to read – even though there’s the constant dirty jokes and the women bashing – and this one really just disappointed me.

The only good thing about these books are how ridiciously fast they are to read.

Reading this book contributed to these challenges: